The art of Flowers_book preview

ART OF flowers pageThe Art of Flowers-A celebration of Botanical Illustration, it’s masters and methods.

Jack Kramer

Watson-Guptill Publications. New York 2002.

Botanical art collector Jack Kramer shares his extensive collection of botanical art, taking the reader on a visual journey throughout the history of the subject. Pages range from small reprinted tutorials on drawing and colouring to full pages of reprinted artworks. An informative read sourced from a range of historical  publications and illustrations, covering a broad range of featured artists throughout history.

Exerpt – FLORILEGIA In 1787, Curtis’s Botanical Magazine was launched in London; soon, flowers became acceptable in their own right as artistic subject matter, not simply as elements in still-life painting. In fact, decorative flower painting became the more popular of the two genres. others argued that flowers were aesthetically of interest and  believed that artists avoided flowers as subjects because they were difficult to paint, not because they were not worth painting “‘£s~ ‘X the two genres. Flowers were glorified in florilegia large picture books by artists such as Pierre-Joseph Redoute and Georg Ehret. Considering how beloved floral illustration has become, it the Swaddlmg Clothes of the should be remembered that as late as the early 1800’s, many  noted authorities held floral art in low regard.

Sir Joshua Reynolds, founder of Englands Royal Academy, declared that it trig mature artist should waste his time on flowers. Fortunately, other’s argued that flowers were aesthetically of interest and ideal for painting. The English critic John Ruskin, for example, believed that artists avoided flowers because they were difficult to paint, not because they were not worth painting.

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